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Family Secrets: Kith and Kin with North Carolina Opera

Family Secrets: Kith and Kin is an opera consisting of produce, as it were, grown in North Carolina. The libretto is by seven esteemed southern writers, the music is by North Carolina born Daniel Thomas Davis, …and staring the shining light behind it all, the extraordinary soprano Andrea Edith Moore.

 

…The roles of Girl, Mother, and Daughter were sung by Moore, who continues to wow audiences with her powerful and flexible soprano voice and her acting ability, her dedication and drive, and her charm that enables such projects as this to be successful.

 

…The ending sequence dealing with forgiveness gave Moore and Holding a duet opportunity: Moore singing in her rich soprano tones and Holding speaking in her generous contralto voice. It yielded a unique and ethereal effect.

 

In the question and answer session after the opera, there were opportunities for colleagues to express their admiration and appreciation for Moore, who was not only the vocal star but also the inspiration for the idea and the guide who saw it through to full realization. Indeed the accolades were well-deserved.”

Micaela in Carmen with

North Carolina Opera

Megan Steigerwald for www.operagasm.com

“Other notable moments were… particularly in ‘Je dis, que rien ne m’epouvante.’

Moore’s instrument has a certain opalescence that is particularly served by her impressive phrasing and inherent musicality; the enthusiastic applause she received at the end of the evening demonstrated this laudable achievement did not go unnoticed.”

 Micaela in Carmen with

North Carolina Opera

Roy C. Dicks

for the

Raleigh News and Observer

“Andrea Edith Moore's Micaëla, in love with Don José, garners the biggest ovation for her emotional Act Three aria vowing to confront Carmen.”

The Governess in The Turn of the Screw with North Carolina Opera

Roy C. Dicks

for the

Raleigh News and Observer

“Andrea Edith Moore’s warm soprano soared though the governess’s lines – her diction clear, her acting assured. “

The Governess in The Turn of the Screw with North Carolina Opera

Tom Moore for Classical Voice of North Carolina www.cvnc.org

“The star of the show was Andrea Edith Moore as the Governess, with beautiful and clear tones, and every word and phrase distinct, and convincingly more and more distracted as the drama progressed.”

Guest Soloist with The Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle

”Her [Moore’s] first selection “Oh, how much suffering!” from Smetana’s The Bartered Bride revealed a voice velvety smooth in quality and clear and clean as the recent fall air in the Triangle. Next on the program was Tchaikovsky’s awesomely dramatic aria from The Queen of Spades, “It will soon be Midnight,” giving the orchestra a magnificent score to perform and Moore the opportunity to display the power and control of her vocal talent.
 
After intermission we heard one of the most poignant arias in the opera repertoire – “Song to the Moon” from Dvorák’s Rusalka. It was pure magic. The soaring strings, woodwinds and harp along with the somber brass melded with Moore’s expressive and shimmering voice, and a rapturous pleasure to hear.”

Knoxville:Summer of 1915 by Barber with The Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle

“Moore’s superbly controlled performance spoke of innocence and confidence mingled with awe and uncertainty. She employed almost no vibrato underscoring the youthful musings of the narrative. I was a little surprised to find tears on my cheeks at the end of this piece. It does not matter whether the setting is Knoxville or Cleveland or Durham, the words of Agee and the music of Barber and a performance as fine as this reminds us all that we are also part of that family laying on a quilt on the grass, gazing at the stars, wondering who we are. Amazing!”

High Priestess in Aida with North Carolina Opera

Roy C. Dicks

for the

Raleigh News and Observer

“Andrea Edith Moore’s off-stage Priestess was hauntingly ethereal.”